fabric-care-guide

It’s a dirty job but somebody has to do it. By all means, avoid washing your dirty laundry in public! And at home, follow the below mentioned care instructions:

COTTON CARE GUIDE

Washing
  • Machine Wash Cold
  • Gentle Cycle
  • No Tumble Dry
  • Do not Bleach (Use Non-chlorine if you must)
Drying
    • Hang dry in sun
    • Pin tops by hemline
    • Line-dry dark colored clothes in shade
Ironing
    • Remove promptly from dryer and iron while still damp
    • Warm to medium heat setting
    • Iron inside out
    • Do not iron on print
Storing
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Keep storage clean
    • Fold and stack well – heaviest to lightest
Washing

In laundry, it’s Ok to be a Racist.

Wash Your Whites Separately!

If you mess it up, try this:

  • Soak in a solution of non chlorine bleach and cold water for 30 mins.
  • Rinse in warm water
  • For stubborn stains, treat with Color Run Remover

If you still don’t get it, call your mom.

Drying

Running late?

Throwing in a clean dry towel in the dryer with wet clothes will help absorb the moisture, allowing the clothing to dry much faster.

Did you know?

Line drying your clothes outside is illegal in many parts of US.

Do they know?

  • Air-drying uses less energy, which saves money and also the environment.
  • Extends the lifetime of clothing by reducing wear and tear in the dryer
Ironing

Dry, but wrinkled clothes?

You probably left laundry sitting in the dryer for too long.

Toss in a clean, damp towel and turn on the dryer for another 15 minutes. And Voila… Wrinkles be gone!

Storing

To keep fabrics from creasing, tuck sheets of acid-free tissue paper between the fold.

Donating clothes you have fallen out of love with or that no longer fit would lessen your workload whilst earning you some good karma.

Durable and soft, cotton is a versatile fabric and is commonly used for garments as well as home furnishings and bed-linen. It gets softer and more absorbent with every wash but is also known to shrink and wrinkle easily.

There are variants of cotton and depending on the composition, a different care regime is recommended.

100% Pure Cotton

Caring for pure cotton is not as difficult as it seems. Depending on the usability and how treasured your garment is, you can opt between dry-cleaning and hand-wash. With right practices and products, you can easily prolong the life of your cotton clothes.

Handloom Cotton

Hand spun cotton is beautiful to feel and look at. It breathes and absorbs better than machine made cotton. Slight irregularities in texture, color and finish are characteristics of hand-woven fabric and just like art, no two pieces are alike!

It is best to gently hand-wash this type. With little patience and extra caution, you can preserve its textural beauty and character.

Blend

Since cotton is prone to shrinkage and color bleeding, it is usually used in combination with other fabrics. A blended composition can be safely machine washed and dried with no ill effects. Best is to properly follow instructions mentioned on the inside care label of the garment.

~ Fashion is instant language | MIUCCIA PRADA ~

LINEN CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Unfold linens before washing
    • Do not overload the machine
    • Wash at max 40°C
    • Gentle cycle, mild detergent
    • Do not tumble dry
    • Avoid Chlorine bleach. (It’s harmful and causes yellowing. Use Oxygen Bleach/hydrogen peroxide for white linens)
Drying
    • Line dry your linens
    • Do not over dry
    • Hang dark colored clothes in shade
Ironing
    • Iron with steam on slightly damp linen
    • Iron on reverse
Storing
    • First things first. Clean before storing!
    • Good ventilation keeps linens fresh
    • Use bags of cotton, muslin or even better – bags of linen for wrapping your linens
Washing

Sorting your clothes actually begins before the wash cycle.

Separate by type and color.

We have a Trick for Tricky stains:

  • Ink: Soak in milk or in soap-and-ammonia solution
  • Fruit/Coffee/Tea/
    Chocolate:
    Rub with alcohol, white vinegar and ammonia
  • Red Wine: Rub with sparkling water or white wine

For really stubborn stains, use a solution of sodium borate.

If nothing works, you gotta try this...

Sunny side up:Sun makes the stains go away! Spread linen garments out in the sun for a few days!

Drying

Running late?

Spread the damp garment on an ironing board. Lay a thin towel over it. Press using high heat. This dries the fabric quickly without causing any direct damage from hot iron.

To Dry or Not to Dry?

Clothes laundered in a regular cycle in the washing machine can also be safely dried in the dryer.

When in doubt, Air-dry!

Ironing

Take out your linens while still damp, put in a plastic bag and refrigerate. They now become easier to iron and this will also prevent mildew.

Do not be over-stressed over your linens looking crumbled and creased. Wrinkles are inherent in linen and depict its natural beauty and casual nature.

Storing

If you don’t like your linens crushed, do not fold but lay them flat.

Declutter your closet and do away with old linens. This minimizes storage as well as negative energy.

Made from fibers of the flax plant, linen is one beautiful, comfortable, absorbent and durable fabric. It ages gracefully and grows lustrous with every wash, provided it’s taken well care of.

There is a misconception that linen fabric is high maintenance and is only suitable for dry cleaning. The fact is, linen is one of the oldest natural fabrics and has been in use since the Christian Era. This means that linen has been around long before dry cleaners!

It is perfectly fine to hand wash or machine wash linen gently. Hot water and hot iron could do more harm than good. Linen is ever so wrinkly and resists ironing. A non-uniform nubby texture and crush is a tell-tale of real linen and lends the fabric a distinctive appeal.

Burn Test

A simple Burn Test can help you identify real linen. In a metal can, place a few threads from the hem of the fabric and light a candle. Linen will always burn with a yellow flame and smell like burnt glass. It is also known to leave a residue of white ash. Polyester and like synthetic fabrics on the other hand melt into plastic.

~ Dressing is a way of life | YVES SAINT LAURENT ~

DENIM CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Machine wash in cold water
    • Turn inside-out before washing
    • Gentle cycle only
    • Do not tumble dry, if you must, use medium to low heat
    • Hold off on the bleach
Drying
    • Line dry in the shade
    • Shake before hanging to avoid wrinkles
    • Always hang by the waistband
Ironing
    • Iron inside out
    • Medium to low heat setting
    • Use steam and gently press the iron on the cloth
    • Use starch for perfect, crisp clothes
Storing
    • Keep storage clean
    • Don’t pack folded denims too tightly
    • Hang denim jackets and vests in a less crowded closet
Washing

Dark Wash denims tend to bleed. Unless you secretly wish for an all blue wardrobe, wash your jeans with like colours.

Frozen jeans anyone?

If you’re not keen to clean, put denims in the freezer overnight to get rid of odor causing bacteria.

And, if you’re strong hearted, you can also stick them in the oven at 300 degrees Fahrenheit for similar results.

Drying

Shrinkage after drying?

With a little elbow grease, you can reverse any shrinkage caused to your favorite pair of jeans.

  • Spray with lukewarm water
  • Stand on each leg of the jeans
  • Start pulling

Tada! Your jeans now fit you again. (If they still don’t – a little exercise maybe?)

Ironing

Wanna get wrinkles out without using an iron?

  • Dampen denim exactly where the wrinkle is
  • Use your hair dryer to dry the spot

Rejoice! You just used the ‘Spot De-wrinkling Technique!’

Storing

Hang ‘em high!

Use a skirt/pant hanger to hang a particularly expensive pair of jeans. Folding them will cause them to fade faster.

Done with your denim?

Old denim clothes don’t need to be thrown away. Repurpose old denims and create bags, mobile phone holders, area rugs and much more.

(Or maybe just donate them and add points to your good deed account!)

Denim is a rugged cotton twill textile, which was first used as clothing for workers in America owing to the strength and durability of the fabric. Such is the strength of the fabric, that Levis Strauss wanted it to be used for creating tents and wagon covers.

The original denim was 100% cotton but now the material can be found in different types and blends adding to the fabric’s features. These types include:

Raw Denim - As opposed to other types, raw or dry denim is not washed after it is produced. It is advised to use the least washing or heating to this fabric.

Selvage Denim - This is also an unwashed denim type. It’s best not to machine wash this fabric. Just soak them for a while and scrub off the dirt.

Stretch Denim - 2% Spandex is added to this material to create the most comfortable stretch jeans. These can be washed in very cold water. Avoid bleach at all costs.

Poly Denim - Blended with polyester, this is a lightweight material that can be washed and dried quickly. Shrinkage and wrinkles are minimal in this kind of denim.

Ramie Cotton Denim - This material is very flexible and strong. It retains its shape and texture even after multiple washes. It can be machine washed and air dried for best results.

Over the years, it has become the most versatile fabric and is used to make jeans, vests, jackets, dresses and much more. Since the material is prone to shrinkage and bleeding, it is best to ardently stick to the given care instructions.

~ Simplicity is the key note of all true elegance | COCO CHANEL ~

RAYON CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Hand wash in cold water with mild detergent
    • Can be dry-cleaned
    • Machine wash only if the label says so
    • Wash dark colors separately
    • Avoid bleaching
Drying
    • Air dry in shade
    • Dries best on a drying rack
    • If you want to hang, do so only on a non-metal hanger
Ironing
    • Iron while still damp to ease the wrinkling
    • Low heat setting
    • Iron inside out with a pressing cloth to protect it
Storing
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Store in a flat manner on an acid free paper
    • Keep storage clean
Washing

Have you shrunken a piece of rayon clothing? Before you throw it out, try this method:

  • Mix 1 tbsp baby shampoo in a large bowl filled with some water and place that shrunken garment in it.
  • Let it stay for a few minutes and then take it out.
  • Stretch it out to its original shape while it’s still drying.
  • Lay it to dry in shade. If it retains its original shape, you just got lucky!

Food for thought:

Washing clothes in cold water will help you save on electricity bill!

Drying

Remember:

Not to leave damp clothes in the washing machine for long as it creates a very unpleasant smell.

Ironing

Wondering how to remove wrinkles from your Rayon piece of clothing?

  • Get an iron and turn it on to the steam setting.
  • Place Aluminium foil on your ironing board and lay your rayon item on it.
  • Instead of placing the iron directly on the rayon piece, keep it away at least 3 inches.
  • Move it back and forth to allow the heat to warm the fabric as well as the foil.
  • This will create a steam effect which will help banish wrinkles.
Storing

While Hanging your rayon garment, pad the shoulders with tissue. That would prevent stretching.

Rayon fabric was the first synthetic fabric to be ever made. The silk-like fabric, is a great alternative to silk as it not only looks similar, but also feels similar. Since it can easily shrink and get wrinkles, it is essential that you take proper care of it. Always hand wash it in cold water with mild detergent unless otherwise specified. Air dry it in cool shade and protect it from sunlight. To ensure that it doesn’t get any wrinkles, iron it when it is slightly damp.

The fabric is widely used in the manufacture of apparels such as tops, bottoms, dresses, blouses, sportswear, gym clothes and more. You may be surprised to know that even products like bed sheets, blankets and slipcovers are made using this fabric.

~ I like my money where I can see it - hanging in my closet | CARRIE BRADSHAW ~

VISCOSE CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Hand wash in cold water with a gentle detergent
    • Turn your viscose item inside out if it’s machine washable
    • Dry-clean if the label says so
Drying
    • Air dry in shade
    • Remove excess water from items by shaking and hang them on plastic hangers
Ironing
    • Iron while still damp to ease the wrinkling
    • Low heat setting
    • Iron inside out with a pressing cloth to protect it
Storing
    • Store in a flat manner
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Keep storage clean
Washing

Are you doing this?

Your clothes are squeaky clean after the wash, but that leaves your washing machine pretty messed up over time.

A rinse with Hydrogen peroxide or white vinegar can leave your washer looking new again.

Drying

Did you know?

  • Drying viscose items under prolonged sun exposure can weaken its fibers.
  • Drying clothes indoors can cause health problems due to the contaminated indoor air.
Ironing

Takeaway Tip:

By placing a cloth between the viscose item and iron, you can prevent viscose from getting shiny.

Storing

Are you struggling to store your clothes in your tiny closet?

Try this!

Put a ring pull on your hangers to double their efficiency.

Viscose fabric is produced during a process called the viscose process, wherein it’s made using wood pulp or cotton linter. It is one of the most common types of rayon and bears a close resemblance to silk. The good news is that it does not cost a fortune like silk and is very light-weight in texture. But since it is manufactured with a high concentration of caustic soda, it is not very durable.

To wash viscose items properly, ensure that you read the instructions mentioned on the label. While some viscose items must be hand-washed, some can also be machine-washed and even bleached. Then, there are some items that should only be dry-cleaned. It is recommended to wash them in cold water using a mild cleaning product.

~ Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak | RACHEL ZOE ~

POLYESTER CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Machine Wash Cold
    • Gentle Cycle
    • No Tumble Dry
    • Do not Bleach (Use Non-chlorine if you must)
Drying
    • Hang dry in sun
    • Pin tops by hemline
    • Line-dry dark colored clothes in shade
Ironing
    • Remove promptly from dryer and iron while still damp
    • Warm to medium heat setting
    • Iron inside out
    • Do not iron on print
Storing
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Keep storage clean
    • Fold and stack well – heaviest to lightest
Washing

Hey, it’s Ok to be a Racist.

Wash Your Whites Separately!

If you mess it up, try this:

  • Soak in a solution of chlorine bleach and cold water for 30 mins.
  • Rinse with warm water
  • For stubborn stains, treat with Color Run Remover

If you still don’t get it, call your mom.

Drying

Running late?

Throwing in a clean dry towel in the dryer with wet clothes will help absorb the moisture, allowing the clothing to dry much quicker.

Did you know?

Line drying your clothes outside is illegal in many parts of US.

Do they know?

  • Air-drying uses less energy, which saves money and also environment.
  • Extends the lifetime of clothing by reducing wear and tear in the dryer
Ironing

Dry, but wrinkled clothes?

You probably left laundry sitting in the dryer for too long.

Toss in a clean, damp towel and turn on the dryer for another 15 minutes. And Voila… Wrinkles be gone!

Storing

To keep fabrics from creasing, tuck sheets of acid-free tissue paper between the fold.

Donating clothes you have fallen out of love with or that no longer fit would lessen your workload whilst earning you some good karma.

GEORGETTE CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Dry cleaning recommended
    • Machine wash in cold water
    • Use mild detergent only
    • Gentle cycle only
    • Do not bleach
Drying
    • Air dry in shade
    • Do not wring the fabric
    • Avoid using clothespins
Ironing
    • Medium to low heat setting
    • Do not exceed 330° Fahrenheit
    • Dry iron only
Storing
    • Do not hang
    • Refold fabric every few weeks
    • Change fold lines to avoid ripping
Washing

Miss Bleach?

Baking soda is a colour-safe bleach alternative which is perfect for georgette and will also make your clothes odour-free.

Drying

Drying Hack:

The weight of water will stretch georgette out of shape after you hang it to dry.

To avoid a ruined dress or saree, wrap your clothes in a dry towel and start patting. Once you feel the material is not heavy anymore, you’re ready to hang.

Ironing

Did you know?

Your georgette clothes are so sensitive, even water can stain them! This is why it is advised to avoid steam ironing.

Don't Press When You Press!

While you iron georgette, make sure you are gentle and don’t press the iron on the clothing. It’s best to keep moving the iron around to avoid burnt clothes.

Storing

Pro Tip!

If you absolutely need to hang your clothes, use a padded hanger as they will be gentle and keep them wrinkle free.

Georgette is a light-weight, sheer fabric, that gives a bouncy and crinkled look. It is woven in highly twisted yarns in two forms - Pure and Faux. Pure Georgette is woven out of Silk yarns, while the Faux Georgette is woven from Rayon and Polyester.

It was introduced in the 20th century by Madame Georgette de la Plante, who was a French dressmaker. It is believed that chiffon was the inspiration for georgette, but the latter is more durable than the former.

It is now available in several variants including:

  • Jacquard Georgette fabric
  • Nylon Georgette fabric
  • Viscose Georgette fabric
  • Silk Georgette fabric
  • Polyester Georgette fabric
  • Satin Georgette fabric

~ Fashion is about something that comes from within you | RALPH LAUREN ~

CHIFFON CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Machine Wash Cold
    • Gentle Cycle
    • No Tumble Dry
    • Do not Bleach (Use Non-chlorine if you must)
Drying
    • Hang dry in sun
    • Pin tops by hemline
    • Line-dry dark colored clothes in shade
Ironing
    • Remove promptly from dryer and iron while still damp
    • Warm to medium heat setting
    • Iron inside out
    • Do not iron on print
Storing
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Keep storage clean
    • Fold and stack well – heaviest to lightest
Washing

Hey, it’s Ok to be a Racist.

Wash Your Whites Separately!

If you mess it up, try this:

  • Soak in a solution of chlorine bleach and cold water for 30 mins.
  • Rinse with warm water
  • For stubborn stains, treat with Color Run Remover

If you still don’t get it, call your mom.

Drying

Running late?

Throwing in a clean dry towel in the dryer with wet clothes will help absorb the moisture, allowing the clothing to dry much quicker.

Did you know?

Line drying your clothes outside is illegal in many parts of US.

Do they know?

  • Air-drying uses less energy, which saves money and also environment.
  • Extends the lifetime of clothing by reducing wear and tear in the dryer
Ironing

Dry, but wrinkled clothes?

You probably left laundry sitting in the dryer for too long.

Toss in a clean, damp towel and turn on the dryer for another 15 minutes. And Voila… Wrinkles be gone!

Storing

To keep fabrics from creasing, tuck sheets of acid-free tissue paper between the fold.

Donating clothes you have fallen out of love with or that no longer fit would lessen your workload whilst earning you some good karma.

VELVET CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Machine Wash Cold
    • Gentle Cycle
    • No Tumble Dry
    • Do not Bleach (Use Non-chlorine if you must)
Drying
    • Hang dry in sun
    • Pin tops by hemline
    • Line-dry dark colored clothes in shade
Ironing
    • Remove promptly from dryer and iron while still damp
    • Warm to medium heat setting
    • Iron inside out
    • Do not iron on print
Storing
    • Pack only clean and dry clothes
    • Keep storage clean
    • Fold and stack well – heaviest to lightest
Washing

Hey, it’s Ok to be a Racist.

Wash Your Whites Separately!

If you mess it up, try this:

  • Soak in a solution of chlorine bleach and cold water for 30 mins.
  • Rinse with warm water
  • For stubborn stains, treat with Color Run Remover

If you still don’t get it, call your mom.

Drying

Running late?

Throwing in a clean dry towel in the dryer with wet clothes will help absorb the moisture, allowing the clothing to dry much quicker.

Did you know?

Line drying your clothes outside is illegal in many parts of US.

Do they know?

  • Air-drying uses less energy, which saves money and also environment.
  • Extends the lifetime of clothing by reducing wear and tear in the dryer
Ironing

Dry, but wrinkled clothes?

You probably left laundry sitting in the dryer for too long.

Toss in a clean, damp towel and turn on the dryer for another 15 minutes. And Voila… Wrinkles be gone!

Storing

To keep fabrics from creasing, tuck sheets of acid-free tissue paper between the fold.

Donating clothes you have fallen out of love with or that no longer fit would lessen your workload whilst earning you some good karma.

LYCRA CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Hand wash recommended
    • When machine washing Lycra, place the garments in a mesh washing bag
    • Wash in lukewarm water, on gentle cycle
    • Tumble dry low/medium heat
    • Wash with like colors
    • Do not use chlorine bleach. (It can result in discoloration, irreversible stretch and breakage of the Lycra fibers)
Drying
    • Do not pin wet garments. Lay them flat over the rails of a drying rack
    • Dry away from direct heat and sun
    • Although safe to machine dry, a very high setting can affect the elasticity of the fabric
Ironing
    • Not always needed
    • Rapid ironing, if you must
    • Low temperature setting lest Lycra fabric gets scorched
Storing
    • Store only when clean and dry
    • Keep storage clean
    • Do not store in a damp closet
    • Do not hang. Fold and store to prevent stretching
Washing

To prevent dye from bleeding:

Soak in a white vinegar and water mixture, 30 mins before the wash.

To remove strong and foul odours:

Soak overnight in a bucket full of water and a cup of bicarbonate of soda.

Drying

After a gentle wring, roll the garment in a large clean towel and gently press to get the water out.

Do not stretch out spandex garments. They will take their original size and shape when fully dried.

Ironing

Do not iron any garment made up of more than 30 per cent spandex.

Storing

Lycra tends to lose elasticity overtime. So, do not stock up on Lycra garments and get rid of old unshapely clothes to de-clutter.

Lycra was first produced as a replacement to rubber. It is made of a long chain polymer called polyurethane, which is in-turn produced by reacting polyester with a diisocyanate.

Lycra/Spandex leggings became popular during 1970’s and 1980’s when the rock band performers flaunted them. Denims and leather trousers tend to sag and lose their fit after a while, so these were replaced with lycra or spandex clothing that provided long lasting fit and better movement onstage.

Since that time, from New York to Paris, LA to London, Lycra is popular world over.

Properties of Lycra:

  • High Elasticity
  • Dull luster
  • Slow to burn
  • Low strength compared to most other synthetic fiber
  • Resistance to organic solvents including dry cleaning solvents
  • Degraded by chlorine bleach
  • Although dyeable, some varieties can be averse to dying

Lycra is seldom used entirely as a whole. It is often used in conjunction with other natural as well as man-made fabrics to get a versatile blended composition. Even a small percentage of Lycra in any fabric results in extra comfort, flexibility, fit enhancement, shape retention and wrinkle resistance.

Being highly stretchable, Lycra is considered to be a ‘second to skin’ fabric and is therefore commonly used in skin tight clothing like sportswear, compression garments, shapewear, hosiery, club-wear and more.

~ People will stare. Make it worth their while | HARRY WINSTON ~

SILK CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Dry Clean recommended
    • Hand Wash in Cold Water
    • Delicate Cycle & Mild Detergent for Machine Washing
    • Shortest Spin Cycles
    • Always Separate Colors
    • No Tumble Dry
    • Do not Bleach
Drying
    • Hang to Dry
    • Avoid direct Sunlight
    • Avoid wooden drying racks
Ironing
    • Use Low Setting on iron
    • Iron while the clothes are still damp
    • Press the garment inside out while ironing
    • Keep a press cloth between the garment to avoid shine
Storing
    • Store silk fabrics flat or cover with clean white muslin and pad with white tissue in case the garments are hung
    • A natural anti-moth repellent works well to keep those naughty larvae from having a hearty meal!
    • Make sure your silk clothes are absolutely clean and dry prior to storage
Washing

Try these for stains:

  • Diluted vinegar does the trick
  • Glycerin & lukewarm water make a good couple for washing away sudden tea and coffee spills
  • For stubborn stains, you can use warm water mixed with cream of tartar (yes it’s available and not a foreign ingredient!) and crushed aspirin

If you’re still in a veritable mess of sorts, reach out to your wife or mom!

Drying

If you rightfully steer clear of the dryer:

Put the wet silk garment flat on an absorbent and clean towel and roll it up to get rid of the extra moisture. Repeat after unrolling using another dry towel and then lay it flat on another dry towel or drying rack.

Who knew towels were so important?

Do you know?

Wet silk may yellow when exposed to direct sunlight for a prolonged period of time.

Ironing

Are your dry clothes playing wrinkle-twinkle?

When it comes to minor wrinkles, just hang in the bathroom while you take a shower! Humidity will do the trick!

Storing

Always keep silk fabrics in a dry and dark place and avoid plastic since the material is breathable.

Instead of letting your old silk clothes pile up, you can always unleash your own creativity and modify the fabric into accessories like hair ties, bracelets, headbands, belts and more.

Exuding class and elegance, silk is a fabric with a rich heritage dating back to thousands of years. Its origin is known to be around the Indus Valley Civilization between 2450 BC and 2000 BC. Today, India is world’s second largest producer of silk, 2nd only to China.

One of the most pricey fabrics out there, silk is much sought after despite a hefty price tag because of its sheer opulence.

Handspun using intricate procedures, silk is one of the strongest natural fibers, yet is a delicate fabric to care for. Although dry-cleaning is recommended but frequent trips to the dry-cleaner are not good for your beloved silk either. It also gets weakened with excessive exposure to sun and is prone to insects attack if left unclean. If handled with love and care, silk can last you a long time.

Properties of Silk:

  • Strongest Natural Fiber
  • Good Insulation quality. Stays warm in winter and cool in summer
  • Shiny and luxurious in appeal
  • Poor Elasticity
  • Is highly dyeable
  • Bit difficult to care but extremely comfortable to wear

Types of Silk

Like a local language, silk type also changes with a little distance travelled. In India especially, almost every state has its own variant of silk. Some of the most common silk types across the world are:

  • Mulberry Silk: This variety is the most common silk available in the world. It is obtained from silkworms which are fed from the Mulberry Bush. China, Japan and Korea have this silk in abundance. Since the worms are killed in their cocoons in order to extract long fibres, it is considered as an unethical way of obtaining silk.
  • Raw Silk: A widely used, unprocessed form of silk that can be woven into different fabrics.
  • Tussar Silk: Also called as Wild Silk, this silk type is exclusive of India and radiates a rich gold sheen.
  • Art Silk: Short form for artificial silk, it is an inexpensive alternative to silk. Produced from a synthetic fiber like Rayon to get a resemblance of silk.
  • Pashmina Silk: Combined with Pashmina wool to get a fabric that defines elegance. Extensively used to produce scarves, stoles, home furnishing and more.
  • Tanchoi Silk: Woven using a technique that blends silk from two countries, China and India.

Did you know?

  • The strength of silk fabric is equivalent to that of a metal wire.
  • 10 Kgs of Cocoons produce 1 Kg of silk.
  • Spider silk is the strongest of them all.
  • Silk is also obtained from Mussels.

Test for Real Silk - Burn Test

Not a fool-proof method, but this burn test is fairly definitive to tell real silk from synthetic.

Take a few strands of silk fabric and put them to flame.

Genuine silk is known to burn like human hair and will leave a powdery black ask residue. When the flame is taken away, the threads stop burning.

Synthetic fabric on the other hand burns like plastic and produces black smoke. It continues to burn even when the flame is out.

~ Elegance is not standing out, but being remembered | GIORGIO ARMANI ~

WOOL CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Gentle hand-wash or machine wash
    • Cold water cycle. Warm/Hot water can make wool shrink
    • Wash using a detergent specially formulated for wool
    • No Tumble Dry. If you must, use mild setting
    • Do not bleach
    • Wash dark colors separately
Drying
    • Do not peg or line dry. Lay them flat to avoid stretch and distortion
    • Do not over dry
Ironing
    • Iron with steam while the woolens are slightly damp
    • Iron on reverse, especially if embellished
Storing
    • Store only clean and dry woolens. Dirty wool only invites more pests and larvae
    • Store in cotton bags. Plastic containers can be used too but they don’t allow air circulation
    • Store in a windowless closet. Light can fade garments
Washing

With timely spot-cleaning and airing, your woolens would need infrequent washing.

Soaking wool garments in cold water for a few hours before washing will prevent shrinkage.

Promptly address stains. If left to sit, they become immovable.

  • Use Glycerine to remove ink stains
  • Beer stains can be removed with a moistened toilet paper
  • Lemon Juice works well for hair dye stains
Drying

Fancy a Quickie?

Lay the washed garment over a thick absorbent towel as it wicks up a lot of moisture.

And if, you are drying your clothes inside, you might want to forget a little about electricity bills and leave the fan running.

Ironing

Dry heat can make the wool fabric scorch.

Don’t have a steam iron?

Wet a clean white cotton towel, wring it and use it to add moisture during ironing. Or, use a mist spray to sprinkle some water.

Storing

Pillowcases can be great storage containers for woolens. Cotton exterior acts like a barrier for larvae.

Winter is Coming…

But, it goes fairly quickly too. You probably don’t need too many woolens.

Less Clothes = Less Storage Woes

Wool is a beautiful natural fiber and has been used by human kind for over 3000 years. Animal fur/hair is spun into yarn to obtain the wonderfully warm and soft wool that looks comforting and luxurious at the same time. The oldest wool was found in Denmark and dates back to 1500 B.C.

Despite all the glory, maintaining wool is a tricky affair. With improper care or mishandling, wool is easily damaged. It may take a little extra effort to care for wool, but it is worth it.

Qualities of Wool:

  • Wool is elastic and resilient.
  • Wool is absorbent. It has a complex cellular structure which enables it to absorb moisture, while repelling liquid.
  • Wool can be dyed deeply in beautiful, rich hues.
  • Wool has insulating properties, which makes it trap heat and also absorb moisture.


Types of Wool:

  • Sheep Wool: One of the most traditional wool, spun from sheep fleece.
  • Merino Wool: Merino wool is considered to be one of the most warm wool type, hence it is expensive too. It is taken from Merino Sheep and has fine, soft texture. It resists pilling.
  • Angora Wool: Made from Angora rabbit hair. This wool type is extremely fluffy and soft. Nylon blend imparts stability.
  • Cashmere Wool: Considered as one of the most luxurious wool type, Cashmere is obtained from the fleece of Cashmere goat. There was a generation where a person’s worth was calculated in terms of the number of cashmere items possessed.
  • Lamb’s Wool: A soft, virgin wool that is shorn from a seven-eight month old lamb.

~ Fashion is not for sissies | MICHAEL KORS ~

NYLON CARE GUIDE

Washing
    • Machine Wash in warm water
    • Do not wash with other fabrics
    • Use Non-Chlorine bleach only
    • Keep dryer setting on low
Drying
    • Drip dry after a drying cycle in the machine
    • Smooth cuffs and seams while clothes are still wet
    • Lay knit garments like sweaters flat to dry
Ironing
    • Iron inside out
    • Use the lowest heat setting
    • Dry iron only
Storing
    • Use padded or wooden hangers
    • Hang neatly in a roomy closet
    • Keep storage clean
Washing

Clothes too clingy?

Add this to your washing routine:

Nylon is super prone to static cling. Don’t worry, you can curb the cling by adding fabric softener into your machine.

Drying

Drying like a pro

If you’re in a rush, try this to dry your nylons faster:

Roll the wet piece of clothing inside a dry cloth such as a towel. The towel will soak up the most prominent moisture from your clothing and then you can hang it to dry. It won’t take more than a few minutes.

This works well for nylons as they are highly water resistant and don’t absorb a lot of water in the first place.

Ironing

Not a fan of ironing?

You’re in luck! Nylon is low maintenance and can remain wrinkle-free without ironing for a considerably long time.

If you do notice wrinkles try this:

  • Hang your nylons in a steamy bathroom
  • Run a washcloth along the length of the cloth

Voila! No more wrinkles.

Storing

Did you know?

Nylon clothes are resistant to moth, mold and mildew.

So, you can hang them in your closet or in storage bins without worrying about damage – considering you store them once they’re absolutely clean.

Nylon is a durable artificial fibre made from petroleum products. It is one of the most commonly used polyamides, and was first produced on February 28, 1935. It was invented by Wallace Carothers.

Owing to the fact that it is extremely strong, easy to make and also very versatile, nylon is now used to make clothing, string, carpets, bags, fishing nets and even parachutes.

After its invention, nylon was first used to make toothbrushes. Today, nylon is among the many polymer products in common daily use throughout the world.

Certain characteristics of nylon include:

  • Exceptionally strong
  • Elastic
  • Abrasion resistant
  • Lustrous
  • Easy to wash
  • Resistant to damage from oil and many chemicals
  • Can be pre-coloured or dyed in wide range of colours
  • Resilient
  • Low in moisture absorbency
  • Filament yarns provide smooth, soft, long-lasting fabrics
  • Spun yarns lend fabrics light weight and warmth

Nylon is very sensitive to heat and should be washed and dried on cool settings. Extreme heat can permanently wrinkle the fabric. The fabric can be hung to dry, and dries very quickly due to its inherent properties.

As it is a strong fabric, its care is easy and often taken for granted. It is advised not to overlook the sewn on care instructions to preserve the fabric for a longer time.

~ The joy of dressing is an art | JOHN GALLIANO ~